Scale/Chord Forms

Standard Scale and Chord Forms

Five Standard Forms

  • The Metafrets system uses the notion of five standard forms for naming chords and scales.
  • These forms are numbered as 1st form (roots on 6th, 4th and 1st strings.), 2nd form (roots on the 5th and 3rd strings), 3rd form (root on the on the 4th and 2nd strings), 4th form (on the 6th, 3rd and 1st strings) and 5th form (roots on the 5th and 1st strings).
  • Each form represents a transposition across the neck (see article on Mechanical Transposition) of the previous form.
  • In ascending form number order, the transposition across the neck is a perfect 4th, or 5 semi-tones with 4 note names. For instance, moving from the A scale on string 6 to the D scale on string 5.
  • In descending form number order, the transposition across the neck is a descending perfect 4th, or 5 semi-tones with 4 note names. For instance, moving from the D scale on string 5 to the A scale on string 6.

Chord Forms

  • The standard major chord forms can be seen at the nut, where there is an E major chord, with roots on 6th, 4th and 1st strings.
  • The E major can be transposed to an A major by moving it one set of strings higher, adjusting the note on the second string by raising a fret, and mirroring the note on the 1st string onto the 6th string.
  • The roots of the A major are on the 5th and 3rd strings.
  • The A major can be transposed to a D major by moving it one set of strings higher, with the adjustments on the 2nd and 6th strings.
  • The roots of the D major are on the 4th and 2nd strings.
  • The D major can be transposed to a G major by moving it one set of strings higher, with the adjustments on the 2nd and 6th strings.
  • The roots of the G major are on the 6th, 3rd and 1st strings.
  • The G major can be transposed to a C major by moving it one set of strings higher, with the adjustments on the 2nd and 6th strings.
  • The roots of the C major are on the 5th and 1st strings.
  • The chords E major, A major, D major, G major, and C major are the basis for the movable chord forms 1st major, 2nd major, 3rd major, 4th major, and 5th major.
  • An additional transposition of C major across the neck results in the F major bar chord, which is the 1st major chord form.
  • This pattern continues across the neck again.
  • Every time you reach the 5th form, start again at the 1st form, but one fret higher.
  • The chord names repeat after 12 chords have been created.

Scale Forms

  • The standard major scale forms can be seen at the nut, where there is an E major scale, with roots on 6th, 4th and 1st strings.
  • The E major can be transposed to an A major by moving it one set of strings higher, adjusting the note on the second string by raising a fret, and mirroring the notes on the 1st string onto the 6th string.
  • The roots of the A major are on the 5th and 3rd strings.
  • The A major can be transposed to a D major by moving it one set of strings higher, with the adjustments on the 2nd and 6th strings.
  • The roots of the D major are on the 4th and 2nd strings.
  • The D major can be transposed to a G major by moving it one set of strings higher, with the adjustments on the 2nd and 6th strings.
  • The roots of the G major are on the 6th, 3rd and 1st strings.
  • The G major can be transposed to a C major by moving it one set of strings higher, with the adjustments on the 2nd and 6th strings.
  • The roots of the C major are on the 5th and 1st strings.
  • The scales E major, A major, D major, G major, and C major are the basis for the movable scale forms 1st major, 2nd major, 3rd major, 4th major, and 5th major.
  • An additional transposition of C major across the neck results in the F major scale, which is the 1st major scale form.
  • This pattern continues across the neck again.
  • Every time you reach the 5th form, start again at the 1st form, but one fret higher.
  • The scale names repeat after 12 scales have been created.

posted by Similkameen Dreams Studioat 4:04 PM